NAACP hosts first voter registration forum for KSU

By DEMETRIA WELLS

The Kennesaw State Collegiate Chapter of the NAACP hosted their first voter registration forum mid-October on campus.

The Kennesaw State Collegiate Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is dedicated to expanding diversity and education on the issues of minorities on the campus of KSU.

This year, the National Chapter NAACP vowed to register hundreds of thousands of Americans to vote and help underprivileged communities whose voting rights were being violated.

NAACP member Khadijah Hill attends the first voter registration on KSU's campus. Photo by Demetria Wells.
NAACP member Khadijah Hill attends the first voter registration on KSU’s campus. Photo by Demetria Wells.

In alignment with this cause, the KSU Collegiate NAACP decided to prepare it’s own voter registration forum to ensure that the students of Kennesaw State University are educated on the Georgia Senatorial and Gubernatorial elections.

The program started with the executive board showing the Republican, Democratic, and Libertarian candidates from the Senatorial and Gubernatorial elections. They also showed clips from each individual’s campaign commercial

The crowd seemed to be majority Democrat based on their vocal reactions. The more negative reactions were to the Libertarian Party.

Khadijah Hill, a member of NAACP and attendee of the program, had the most concerns on current governor and re-election candidate Gov. Nathan Deal.

“It’s really interesting to see how Gov. Deal will handle the subject of the Georgia snow storm last year,” said Hill.  “Metro Atlanta was shut down for a week and people spent hours and even days on the road, so I wonder how he and the other candidates will handle that.”

NAACP also touched on the subject of minority voters and the how the candidates may better serve those communities. This subject resonated for attendee, Corey Holland.

“In my opinion, I feel like Gov. Deal’s platform is very repetitive,” said Holland.  “It will be interesting to see how each candidate will try gain the African-American vote primarily because of the big urban population in Atlanta. As a minority, I feel our voices need to be heard.”

At the end of the program, the attendees were asked what they took away from the program.

“When I to go to the polls, I tend to go and just check boxes,” said Alicia Hicks.  “Now, I feel more comfortable going to vote because I’m aware of who I’m actually voting for.”

The president of the organization, Jasmine Graham, wanted to make sure the event was an unbiased one.  She was ultimately pleased with the outcome.

Jasmine Graham, President, speaks out about her feelings regarding NAACP and voter rights. Photo by Demetria Wells.
Jasmine Graham, President, speaks out about her feelings regarding NAACP and voter rights. Photo by Demetria Wells.

“We wanted to make sure that all the candidates were equally represented, ” said Graham. “The students need to be aware of who they’re voting for to make for a positive influence impact on the number of them who actually go out and vote. Most people tend to only vote in national elections, so I think it’s really important that our organization stresses the importance of voting locally as well as nationally.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s