By BRITTANY MAHER

KENNESAW, Ga. —

Sunrise means the start of a new workday at My Dad and Me Family Farm, a five-acre farm located at 3698 Velma Drive in Powder Springs, Georgia. Husband and wife duo, Daniel and Susan Hammond, have been married for 31 years and side by side, they run the farm with their five grown children. Seven days a week, the Hammond family tends to the farm animals and works the gardens to provide fresh, organic farm products to the metro-Atlanta community. From hand-milking the cows and slopping the hogs every morning, to collecting eggs and plowing the gardens, the family is hard at work on the farm from dawn to dusk. Photo by Brittany Maher
Sunrise means the start of a new workday at My Dad and Me Family Farm, a five-acre farm located at 3698 Velma Drive in Powder Springs, Georgia. Husband and wife duo, Daniel and Susan Hammond, have been married for 31 years and side by side, they run the farm with their five grown children. Seven days a week, the Hammond family tends to the farm animals and works the gardens to provide fresh, organic farm products to the metro-Atlanta community. From hand-milking the cows and slopping the hogs every morning, to collecting eggs and plowing the gardens, the family is hard at work on the farm from dawn to dusk. Photo by Brittany Maher
The farm raises about 250 Rhode Island Red laying hens and about 1,600 broiler chickens every year. The antibiotic free chickens roam the farm pecking at insects in the ground and unlike typical commercial chicken; these chickens get genetically modified organism-free, organic feed that contains no soy. As of January 2013, the animals at My Dad and Me are 100 percent grass-fed and the farm uses New Country Organics to feed all of its grain-fed animals. Photo by Brittany Maher
The farm raises about 250 Rhode Island Red laying hens and about 1,600 broiler chickens every year. The antibiotic free chickens roam the farm pecking at insects in the ground and unlike typical commercial chicken; these chickens get genetically modified organism-free, organic feed that contains no soy. As of January 2013, the animals at My Dad and Me are 100 percent grass-fed and the farm uses New Country Organics to feed all of its grain-fed animals. Photo by Brittany Maher
On the back porch, a sleepy cat keeps guard over the farm’s fresh local honey for sale to customers. The honey is gathered from the farm’s own honeybees, then jarred and set out for purchase. Homemade granola, cereal bars, cashew date bars and baked goods made by Anna, the youngest of the Hammond children, are also a popular back porch purchase for farm-goers. The back porch of the farm is self-served but customers are welcome to ring the bell for assistance.  Photo by Brittany Maher
On the back porch, a sleepy cat keeps guard over the farm’s fresh local honey for sale to customers. The honey is gathered from the farm’s own honeybees, then jarred and set out for purchase. Homemade granola, cereal bars, cashew date bars and baked goods made by Anna, the youngest of the Hammond children, are also a popular back porch purchase for farm-goers. The back porch of the farm is self-served but customers are welcome to ring the bell for assistance. Photo by Brittany Maher
The back porch of the farmhouse has freezers packed with a variety of farm goods made from fresh farm ingredients. Signs posted on each freezer detail what goodies they contain along with their price. In this freezer, customers can find sourdough dough to purchase to make their own bread. Susan Hammond often provides helpful recipes to those looking to use farm products to bake their own homemade masterpieces. Photo by Brittany Maher
The back porch of the farmhouse has freezers packed with a variety of farm goods made from fresh farm ingredients. Signs posted on each freezer detail what goodies they contain along with their price. In this freezer, customers can find sourdough dough to purchase to make their own bread. Susan Hammond often provides helpful recipes to those looking to use farm products to bake their own homemade masterpieces. Photo by Brittany Maher
The Hammond family at My Dad and Me Family Farm put every inch of their five acres to use. They harvest of variety of naturally grown fruits and vegetables with a goal of providing Kennesaw with a variety of fresh picked, sustainable farm food. They grow and sell blackberries, strawberries, Shitake mushrooms, and just about any vegetable you can name. Photo by Brittany Maher
The Hammond family at My Dad and Me Family Farm put every inch of their five acres to use. They harvest of variety of naturally grown fruits and vegetables with a goal of providing Kennesaw with a variety of fresh picked, sustainable farm food. They grow and sell blackberries, strawberries, Shitake mushrooms, and just about any vegetable you can name. Photo by Brittany Maher
Freshly cut by David, one of the Hammond sons, the farm’s pasture sits green and verdant amongst the vines. The soil is freshly plowed and ready to harvest its fall crops. The family sustains the gardens through the rotating the crops regularly and applying barnyard manures. Photo by Brittany Maher
Freshly cut by David, one of the Hammond sons, the farm’s pasture sits green and verdant amongst the vines. The soil is freshly plowed and ready to harvest its fall crops. The family sustains the gardens through the rotating the crops regularly and applying barnyard manures. Photo by Brittany Maher
With all of the horses on the farm now gone, this red horse trailer acts as more of a colorful centerpiece to the farm. Luckily, there are a growing number of other animals on the property. What started as one Jersey milk cow named Maggie quickly turned into 22 cows on the farm. The cows are milked twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, and provide customers in metro-Atlanta with freshly squeezed milk on a weekly basis. Photo by Brittany Maher
With all of the horses on the farm now gone, this red horse trailer acts as more of a colorful centerpiece to the farm. Luckily, there are a growing number of other animals on the property. What started as one Jersey milk cow named Maggie quickly turned into 22 cows on the farm. The cows are milked twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, and provide customers in metro-Atlanta with freshly squeezed milk on a weekly basis. Photo by Brittany Maher
An old, rusted Radio Flyer wagon sits patiently under the farm’s shade waiting for local children to take it for a spin around the farm. The farm is family friendly and open to visitors Monday through Saturday, especially families with little ones. In the distance, a swing set invitingly awaits pint-sized visitors as well.  Children are welcome to stretch their legs and run freely amongst the open, lush surroundings of the farm – all while learning about sustainable farm practices and petting farm animals. Photo by Brittany Maher
An old, rusted Radio Flyer wagon sits patiently under the farm’s shade waiting for local children to take it for a spin around the farm. The farm is family friendly and open to visitors Monday through Saturday, especially families with little ones. In the distance, a swing set invitingly awaits pint-sized visitors as well. Children are welcome to stretch their legs and run freely amongst the open, lush surroundings of the farm – all while learning about sustainable farm practices and petting farm animals. Photo by Brittany Maher
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