Ratio Christi On Kennesaw State Campus

BY CHELSEA HILL

KENNESAW, Ga. — Ratio Christi, which has been a part of Kennesaw State’s campus since 2013, has changed the way some people think about Jesus Christ.

Many Christian organizations on the Kennesaw State campus, such as Cru, Adventist Christian Fellowship, and Baptist Collegiate Ministries, all share a common goal: bringing more people in the belief of Jesus Christ. Ratio Christi, however, is taking a nontraditional route to try and spread its message.

Ratio Christi is a global movement that equips university students and faculty to give historical, philosophical, and scientific reasons for following Christ. Ratio Christi places Christian apologetics clubs in universities around the world so that the students can provide an intellectual voice of Christ. The organization wants students to be able to defend God’s existence not only through the Bible’s teaching, but also with scientific facts.

Ratio Christi, which is Latin for “The Reason of Christ,” was established on the Kennesaw campus in 2013 by Casey Wilson. Ratio Christ was put onto Kennesaw State in order to engage Christian and non-Christian students in friendly discussions, lectures and debates.

The president of Ratio Christi, Jonathan Mann, gave a few reasons why Ratio Christi is different than the other Christian-led ministries on campus.

“There’s a lot of Bible studies. There’s a lot of Christian organizations on campus,” said Mann. “But there’s no apologetics organization. So I think a lot of times people have a mentality that Christians just believe something because they believe it’s true. Kind of like circular reasoning.”

Mann said he thinks there is good evidence of the truth of the Christian world view.

“I think that if you want to hold a belief and if you want to believe that something is true then you should be able to justify that,” he said.

Ratio Christi hold debates with followers of Christ and followers of other faiths to give concrete evidence that Jesus Christ is real.

Mann, who identifies as a Messianic Jew, spoke about one of the atheist students who attended a lecture where Mann gave historical evidence for the resurrection of Jesus. Mann says that during the question and answer portion of the lecture, the student commented and said that he is still skeptical about the resurrection, but at the same time he also couldn’t think of a way to refute it.

Ratio Christi will be teaming up with the organization Atheist United to sponsor a debate between both groups.

“My organization is different in the sense that it’s not a Bible study and it’s not a worship service,” Mann said. “It’s a place where we basically come and reason and just wrestle with these questions, bring in a scholar, and have an open dialogue. Discuss philosophical issues, or historical issues, or scientific issues and work through it. You don’t really find that in other Christian groups.”

Ratio Christi is a resource center for people who need more fact-based proof of God’s existence other than from the Bible, which has been written and re-written for many years. The organization plans to be on campus for a long time and spread the truth to other campuses.

The faculty adviser, Victor Marshall, also had a few things to say about Ratio Christi. Marshall had said that he was already interested in apologetics groups, and when he found out they were on the Kennesaw campus, he went to a couple of meetings. Marshall said that he liked how Ratio Christi was open to everyone and allows students to listen to different world views.

Marshall became the faculty adviser the academic year after the past one had retired. Marshall said that he joined because he didn’t see a lot of apologetic organizations in universities or even in churches. Marshall hopes that they will be able to inform more people about apologetics clubs so that the organization will start to branch into more churches and universities.

Even though Ratio Christi is still fairly new, it is growing every day.

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